Dreamer's Fireplace Details


This is a full height photo of the fireplace showing the duct in back with the quilted SS.  Hot air is pulled from the top through this duct by two muffin fans and discharged on both sides at the bottom.  The rectangular outlet at the bottom is for heat from the central hot water heating system.


This is a shot of the upper part of the fireplace, showing the top of the duct by which hot air is drawn.  The quilted SS behind the fireplace is also heated by the exhaust which contributes to warmer air discharged at floor level.


This is a photo of the left side of the lower fireplace cabinet.  The selector switch at the rear top is for the central hot water heat fan.  The panel below that is the on/off switch and alarm for the central hot water heating system.  Next below that is a 110 VAC outlet that does not go through the inverter used for electric heating so the batteries won't be depleted if dockside power goes off.  The round outlet is for hot air drawn from the top of the fireplace by a muffin  fan.  The rectangular vent is for makeup air for the central heating outlet at the front of the cabinet.


This is a photo of the right side of the lower fireplace cabinet.  The switch at the rear is the on/off switch for the fuel pump and combustion air fan for the fireplace as well as for the muffin fans for hot air circulation. The round outlet is for hot air drawn from the top of the fireplace by a muffin  fan.  The rectangular vent is for makeup air for the central heating outlet at the front of the cabinet.  The louvers for the front vent are off for varnishing.  The panels the vents are in are easily removed for maintenance.

This fireplace heats the large main saloon very well on a low to medium setting.  The hot air that is recirculated constantly from top to bottom makes the heating very even.  As the heat is pretty even from top to bottom, the lower area of the main saloon is at the same level as the upper area of the forward staterooms and head, thereby providing comfort in those areas as well.  We prefer those areas to be cooler than the main saloon, so this works out well.  If we wanted more heat in the forward area, we could easily direct a fan from the upper area to the lower area or even a duct with fan to move warmer air.  So far, we haven't felt the need to do this. 

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